Many of you saw on Facebook the video of the torrential rain and wind from earlier today.  Well, it hung around til noon or so, but then the sun came out in varying degrees of glory, so off I set for Taumarumaru Recreation Reserve and Coopers Beach, the first of which is about a 3 minute walk down the cove from my bach with Coopers Beach just on the other side.  By the way, I should have explained about the New Zealand bach, pronounced batch.  A bach is a small, often quite modest, holiday home usually but not necessarily by the sea.  

I meandered around the Reserve for a couple of hours before dropping down to Coopers Beach.  It was a lovely walkabout.  Have a looksee.

Spring is definitely springing here in Far North New Zealand…that’s what the area I’m in is called, Far North. It’s also the Northland, but the Northland has a subsection called, the Far North.

This is a Pōhutukawa, also known as the New Zealand Christmas tree.  I saw many of them on my walk today and find myself wondering if “the party tree” at the entrance to the Kerikeri River Track is one. 

They only grow in the far north New Zealand and can live to 1000 years old.  They can grow upwards of 65 feet tall with a crown 115 feet across.  This particular tree I’d guestimate would take at least 4 adults with arms outstretched to reach around its trunk.

I love them.  Apparently I like my trees big and gnarly because they remind me of my, hitherto, long time favorite, The Live Oak (I wrote my 8th grade paper on them), but I have to say the Pōhutukawa may be taking the lead. The photo below shows why it is known as New Zealand’s Christmas tree.

It’s these red blossoms that cover the trees during the Christmas Season!  My AirBnB hostess tells me this branch belonging to a Pōhutukawa from the neighboring property reaches over into her driveway and blooms early every year.  Fun Fact:  She also tells me many Maori words are the same in Hawaiian, which makes perfect sense given the tiniest sliver of New Zealand history I shared in the Phantom post earlier.

View from a trail in the Reserve.  I love all the volcanic rock. Seems I’ve seen it on every hike I’ve taken so far.

Coming down the other side of the Reserve toward Coopers Beach.

Low tide at Coopers Beach with a hint of red blossom and Pōhutukawa bones in the forecourt.  You may have guessed by now, the banner photo is also a Pōhutukawa.

So that’s it from this fine day.  The sun is still shining and the wind is still winding. 

I think I remember learning whitecaps will form when the wind is around 20 knots.  I wonder how many knots are cranking out there when the whitecaps seem big enough to boogie board? Anyone?

Tomorrow will take me up to the farthest northern point of New Zealand, Cape Reinga.  Since the idea formed for this trip, I’ve had my eye on being there on that spot.  I hear tell it used to be connected to Australia…back in the day. I got this tidbit from Carl, the Department of Conservation trail maintenance guy, during my hike on the peninsula yesterday.

Oh, and by the way, believe it or not, there has been a cream colored dove hanging around here since not long after I arrived.  During the writing of this post, he/she has been in a tree just outside cooing its little heart out.  I wonder if Phantom sent word.  

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Comments:

  • Rusty

    November 24, 2022

    Love those trees!

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    • Margie

      November 25, 2022

      Me too! They are both majestic and magnificent! Hope you and your have enjoyed a happy Thanksgiving 💕 hi to Paul. I saw his doppelgänger in Auckland.

      reply...
    • Margie

      December 9, 2022

      Me too Roo!

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  • Silver Hjellen

    November 24, 2022

    The Pōhutukawa, also known as the New Zealand Christmas tree, is gorgeous and SOOOOO gigantic!!! —–“65 feet tall with a crown 115 feet across. This particular tree I’d guestimate would take at least 4 adults with arms outstretched to reach around its trunk.” Your photos you are sharing are so lovely. Thank you.

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    • Anonymous

      November 25, 2022

      They are magnificent! Hope you and your fam are enjoying a happy Thanksgiving 💕

      reply...
    • Margie

      December 9, 2022

      So glad you’re following along! Hoping to see some of your photos from Sedona and Hawaii!

      reply...
  • Hill

    November 25, 2022

    When the wind speed reaches 12knots small whitecaps will appear and 20knots will produce 1-2′ whitecapping waves. That bird Phantom has you being followed. You are in a beautiful place. Thanks for sharing.

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    • Margie

      December 9, 2022

      Thanks for coming around to share it with me. And for the info on the whitecaps!

      reply...
  • Tena

    December 8, 2022

    Lovely dove. Wonder what it’s message is? What a gorgeous place. Glad the weather allowed you to get out and about.

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    • Margie

      December 9, 2022

      It is SO gorgeous. Really quite something.

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